Posts Tagged ‘UU Fellowship of Raleigh’

A Hero in North Carolina

1 Comment | Share On Facebook| A Hero in North Carolina Share/Save/Bookmark May 10, 2012
tracy_speaking

Tracy Hollister speaks at a Wake County Board of Commissioners' meeting, urging members not to support the amendment. (Credit: News Observer)

The Southeast District of the Unitarian Universalist Association presented Tracy Hollister with a 2012 Congregational Excellence Award from the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Raleigh last weekend in recognition of her tireless efforts to defeat Amendment One.  The amendment bans marriage, civil unions, and domestic partnerships for same-sex couples in the North Carolina state constitution.

As stated in the letter nominating her for the award:

Through her work to defeat the proposed Amendment, Tracy holds up many of our UU principles – the inherent worth and dignity of every person; justice, equity and compassion in human relations; acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations; the right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large; and the goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all…

Tracy’s personal commitment is evident. She reaches out to fellow congregants, and responds quickly to questions about this issue, or how best to show support… She most recently made the difficult decision to leave her job as to leave her job [as a manager of research on corporate training] to dedicate herself full-time to defeating the Amendment…Her energy, talent, commitment, passion, and compassion are amazing.

co-chairs the UUFR Task Force to Protect All NC Families, which held forums at the
congregation and proposed a statement of conscience opposing the amendment,

Tracy’s advocacy against Amendment One is multifaceted. She co-chaired the UU Fellowship of Raleigh Task Force to Protect All North Carolina Families, which held forums at the congregation and proposed a statement of conscience opposing the amendment; co-organized a successful fundraising concert; wrote and directed two videos for the Coalition to Protect All North Carolina Families; and organized 33 phone banks at the Fellowship to identify like-minded voters and get out the vote. Tracy recruited about seven volunteer “staff” to run these phone banks, including Tracy’s best friend and chief phone bank captain Maddy Goss, who was largely responsible for making the phone bank the success that it was. Tracy feels Maddy is equally deserving of this award.

Though Amendment One passed earlier this week, enshrining discrimination into the North Carolina state constitution, Tracy’s work has had an enormous impact on the Raleigh community and is an inspiration to us all. Thank you, Tracy–you are truly a hero.

Speaking Out for LGBT Families in North Carolina

No Comments | Share On Facebook| Speaking Out for LGBT Families in North Carolina Share/Save/Bookmark Apr 05, 2012

The Coalition to Protect All North Carolina Families just released a new video to motivate fair-minded, compassionate and reasonable NC citizens to take specific action to help defeat the discriminatory, anti-gay, and anti-family Amendment One. The amendment will be on the May ballot and, if passed, would ban marriage, civil unions, and domestic partnerships between same-gender couples.

and encourage others to do so by following instructions on this page:
http://uufrprotectsncfamilies.blogspot.com/p/epledge.html
2) Donate to get our message out: https://protectallncfamilies.ngpvanhost.com/crmapi/contribute
3) Sign up for easy “get out the vote” (GOTV) reminder calls to those who pledged to vote against between April 19 and May 5th: http://www.protectncfamilies.org/volunteer
For those in the Raleigh area, we have free food at our “happening” phone banks from 6-9pm:
http://uufrprotectsncfamilies.blogspot.com/p/phone-bank.html
THANKS in advance for protecting the rights of NC”s unmarried couples and their children!
_______________
About this Video: This video was written and directed by Tracy Hollister, Leader of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Raleigh’s Task Force to Protect All Families, which is a member of the Coalition to Protect All NC Families. It was filmed at UUFR on March 24th, 2012 with the video assistance of Eric Preston, Art Lieberman and Karl Ulrich, who did the editing.

If you live in North Carolina, here’s what you can do to make a difference:

1) Take the pledge to vote agains Amendment One and encourage others to do so by following these instructions.

2) Donate to help get the message out.

3) Sign up for easy “get out the vote” (GOTV) reminder calls to those who pledged to vote against Amendement One.

This video was written and directed by Tracy Hollister, leader of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Raleigh’s Task Force to Protect All Families, which is a member of the Coalition to Protect All NC Families. It was filmed at UUFR with assistance from Eric Preston, Art Lieberman and Karl Ulrich. Tracy has a phenomenal commitment to the work for justice for LGBT families in North Carolina. She even resigned from her job in order to dedicate herself to working full-time against the amendment. Bravo, Tracy!

Day 16: Turn the Tide on Anti-LGBT Constitutional Amendments

1 Comment | Share On Facebook| Day 16: Turn the Tide on Anti-LGBT Constitutional Amendments Share/Save/Bookmark Jan 31, 2012

The message below went out on Tuesday, January 31, 2012 to those Standing on the Side of Love supporters who signed up for daily Thirty Days of Love emails. You can sign-up for the 30 Days of Love emails here.


Every once in a while, a group of people does something so loving that it moves me to tears.

This past Sunday, at my beloved UU Fellowship of Raleigh (UUFR), some of us told our stories about how we are affected by discrimination against same-gender couples. We spoke of how things will get even worse if North Carolina’s anti-LGBT, anti-family, so-called “marriage” amendment passes on May 8th. We agreed to an ambitious call to action: our 500+ members will gather 5,000 pledge commitments to vote against the Amendment and do 50 hours of phone banks. Then, unanimously, all present members stood up in a congregational meeting to vote for our statement of conscience opposing the Amendment. We were, literally, all standing together on the side of love. And when the statement passed, there was a spontaneous outburst of clapping and celebratory shouts of joy. Like me, many of my LGBT friends and allies were moved to tears. This vote said to us that we matter, we have value, and we deserve equality; it said we are not alone in this fight and our fellow UU’s are standing with us.

Check out this video from UUFR and learn how you can help:





I hope UU’s from across the country will move me to tears again – by doing virtual phone banks to fight anti-gay amendments in both North Carolina and Minnesota.

Click here to sign up to phone bank.

Another time I was moved to tears was during the act of public witness at our June 2011 UUA General Assembly in Charlotte, NC, where thousands of UU’s in a sea of yellow Standing on the Side of Love t-shirts stood together in opposition to this same anti-LGBT, anti-family NC amendment. It was the power of love and the power of numbers combined that touched not only me, but the many members of what has now become the Coalition to Protect NC Families, which is working to defeat the Amendment. Jen Jones, their Communications Director, was so inspired by Standing on the Side of Love and similar justice movements that she is literally running across North Carolina with “RACE to the Ballot” to raise awareness about the harms of the Amendment. It is no coincidence that she is wearing RACE gear in the same color yellow to be in solidarity with us UU’s; she expects to stand with us UU’s again in the coming weeks and months at rallies before NC’s May 8th ballot referendum.

And I expect to be moved to tears by UU’s across the country when I find out how many people sign up to do what they can from their own states – virtual phone banks to North Carolina and Minnesota voters to urge them to vote against these discriminatory amendments.

While it’s an uphill battle to fight these amendments, with enough volunteers to reach the NC and MN voters who are willing to vote against these amendments, we can turn the tide of discrimination.

Please, move us to tears again with your willingness to stand with us on the side of love. Please volunteer to phone bank now.

In faith,

Tracy Hollister

Tracy Hollister
UU Fellowship of Raleigh

UUs Create a Separation of Church and Hate at Elizabeth Edward’s Funeral

17 Comments | Share On Facebook| UUs Create a Separation of Church and Hate at Elizabeth Edward’s Funeral Share/Save/Bookmark Dec 11, 2010


On Saturday, December 11, about 25 UUs from area Raleigh, NC congregations stood in a crowd of about 200 to oppose the hate speech delivered by members of the Westboro (KS) Baptist church. Westboro protesters were in Raleigh to disrupt the funeral of Elizabeth Edwards. Despite chilly weather, by Raleigh standards, and a steady downpour, people gathered in support of the grace and dignity exemplified by Elizabeth Edwards and in opposition to the negative and hateful accusations voiced by the Westboro group.

On Friday afternoon, the Rev. Deborah Cayer, minister of the Eno River UU Fellowship, sent out a Call for Action of Immediate Witness to the UUCCNC (the cluster of UU congregations in central North Carolina) inviting congregations to join other religious liberals and conservatives who were forming a “line of love” to stand between the protesters and the church where the funeral was to be held. Despite the short notice and heavy rain, UUs from five area congregations gathered behind the “Standing on the Side of Love” banner in quiet witness to the power of love over hate.

Photo by Susan Holahan, UU PEACE Fellowship

Photo by Susan Holahan, UU PEACE Fellowship

Congregations represented were the Eno River UU Fellowship (Durham), the UU Congregation of Hillsborough, the Community Church of Chapel Hill-UU, the UU Fellowship of Raleigh, and UU PEACE Fellowship (North Raleigh).

Joining the group were ministers Ruth Gibson, Patty Hanneman, and Tom Rhodes.

The Revs. Gibson and Hanneman observed that we were indeed active participants in “the separation of church and hate.”